In-Person Exhibition Tour: White Shadows: Anneliese Hager and the Camera-less Photograph

By Harvard Art Museums

Join us in person for a close look at the special exhibition White Shadows, with curator Lynette Roth and curatorial assistant Bridget Hinz.

A black and white photogram with abstract patterns and shapes.

.: Friday, May 20 12pm – 1pm.

Ages: Adults.

Contact

Harvard Art Museums
(617) 495-9400

Registration required

  • Sign-up is ongoing

https://secure.touchnet.net/C20832_ustores/web/store_cat.jsp?STOREID=99&CATID=2…

Tours are limited to 18 people, and it is required that you reserve your place. At 10am the day of the event, reservations will open and may be arranged online through this form. The tour reservation will also serve as your general museum reservation. If required, visitors will pay the museum admission fee upon arrival.

Cost

$20 Adults

$18 Seniors (65+)

Free Sundays—free to all!

Free All students with a valid ID

Free Harvard ID holders (plus one guest)

Free Harvard Art Museums Friends

Free Youth under 18

Free Cambridge residents (proof of residency required)

  • Free for some residents

Location

  • In-person only.

Harvard Art Museums
32 Quincy
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Neighborhood 9

Please meet in the Calderwood Courtyard, in front of the digital screens between the shop and the admissions desk.

Additional information

Join curator Lynette Roth and curatorial assistant Bridget Hinz for an in-depth tour of our special exhibition White Shadows: Anneliese Hager and the Camera-less Photograph, on view through July 31, 2022.

Anneliese Hager (1904–1997) made significant contributions to the medium of camera-less photography and to the wider surrealist movement in Europe. The camera-less photograph, or photogram, is an image made by placing objects directly on (or in close proximity to) a light-sensitive surface and then exposing the assembled material to light. The first exhibition to focus on the role of women makers in the history of the photogram, White Shadows showcases 29 recently acquired photograms made by the artist between the late 1940s and 1960s, as well as a variety of light-based works by Hager’s predecessors and contemporaries.