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Exploring Humanity’s Technological Origins (Free Virtual Event)

By

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture and Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology

a woman in a white button-down shirt looking at an excavated stone

New discoveries have pushed back the date of earliest tool use by our hominin ancestors. In this free virtual talk, Sonia Harmand will explore the implications of these findings for human development.

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Cost

This 事件 is free!

位置

  • Only virtual (online or over the phone).

Dates and Times

.: Wed, April 6 2022 6下午 – 7下午.

Additional information

Sonia F. Harmand, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University; Director, Mission Préhistorique au Kenya/West Turkana Archaeological Project

Human evolutionary scholars have long assumed that the earliest stone tools were made by members of the genus Homo, 2.4–2.3 million years ago, and that this technological development was directly linked to climate change and the spread of savannah grasslands. In the last decade, fieldwork in West Turkana, Kenya, has revealed evidence of much earlier technological behavior. Sonia Harmand will discuss the discovery of stone tools in a 3.3-million-year-old archaeological site in Kenya known as Lomekwi 3. She will show how this discovery is reshaping our understanding of the emergence of human-like manipulative capabilities, as well as the development of cognition in early hominins—the group consisting of modern humans and all our immediate ancestors.

Presented by Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology and Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

a woman in a white button-down shirt looking at an excavated stone

.: Wed, April 6 2022 6下午 – 7下午.

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Harvard Museums of Science and Culture

617-496-6064
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Last updated March 9, 2022.